MBN

NEWS

More asylum seekers could now be sent to Rwanda, home secretary announces

The man who got The Godfather made – by making friends with the Mob
Published Time: 15.05.2024 - 18:40:37 Modified Time: 15.05.2024 - 18:40:37

James Cleverly widens the group who can be deported to the African nation, despite the scheme being aimed at stopping small boat crossings

James Cleverly widens the group who can be deported to the African nation, despite the scheme being aimed at stopping small boat crossings.

Political reporter @alixculbertson

Wednesday 15 May 2024 16:34, UK

Asylum seekers who have already had their claims rejected will now be part of the group being deported to Rwanda, the home secretary has announced.

James Cleverly said the UK has extended the deal it has made with Rwanda to now include those who have come to the UK illegally, claimed asylum and had their application rejected.

Politics live: Sunak accused of 'misleading' MPs during PMQs

Previously, only those deemed to have arrived illegally in the UK on or after 1 January 2022 but had been informed their claim may be inadmissiblebut not officially rejectedwere in the group to be sent to the African country.

Those asylum seekers will then have their asylum claims processed in Rwanda, where they would be allowed to stay if successful, or will have to seek asylum in another country.

Failed asylum seekers will be offered the same "package of support" for up to five years in Rwanda, including education, training, employment and accommodation help.

Be the first to get

Install the Sky News app for free

Mr Cleverly said: "Those who have no right to remain in the UK should not be allowed to stay.

"We have a safe third country ready and waiting to accept people, offer them support across the board and help rebuild their lives.

"We continue to swiftly detain those in line for removal to ensure we have a steady drumbeat of flights to Rwanda."


Keep up with all the latest news from the UK and around the world by following Sky News

The Rwanda scheme was first announced by Boris Johnson in 2022 in an attempt to deter people from making dangerous small boat journeys across the Channel to reach the UK.

But the controversial policy has been plagued by delays, ruled unlawful by the Supreme Court, and attacked by both charities and opposition parties.

Sky News footer

NEWS